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Breakouts

A1: The city as a driver for innovation CANCELLED!!

Unfortunately, this workshop has been cancelled. If you have registered for this workshop, we suggest that you take part in session OT5 “Future Cities” instead. We apologize for the inconvenience.

Track: Society

Session: Session 1 ()

Location: Palaestra ▸ Upper

A2: Acceptance of the call/ Crossing the threshold

In his keynote, Roy Leighton, founder of The Butterfly Model, will give an overview of this humanistic model that provides a framework for allowing the rational process and intelectual rigour of science to be seduced and excited by the chaos and playfulness of the arts. Building off his keynote, Roy will explore through play the stages of the hero’s journey and the six competences that we need to be a hero in life. 

Organized and led by Roy Leighton

Journalist summary

On the premise that the current educational system systematically crushes the inherent genius of four-year-olds, Roy proposed a new approach to learning, which can also be applied to adult individuals and organisations. To make his point, Roy challenged his audience to perform a scene from Shakespeare’s Hamlet. The volunteer actors had a line each, with the whole audience engaged in the learning journey. Roy illustrated the value of play in both personal and organisational development and showed how the four human needs explored in Shakespeare’s text, namely Questioning, Resilience, Relationships and Results, are equally relevant today. In a lively and engaging group activity, the audience was led from a state of Unconscious Incompetence, through Conscious Incompetence, Conscious Competence to Unconscious Competence – the stages in which successful learning takes place. The brave volunteer actors were rewarded with a copy of Roy’s book, “101 Days to Make a Change.”

Nicole Tyszkiewicz

Track: Society

Session: Session 2 ()

Location: Ideon ▸ Backstage

A3: How to combat friction by design

In this forum we will discuss the delta between the possible, and the limiting, affecting our mindset and actions when it comes to innovation. How are we bound by dominating designs? Technologically and conceptually?

- Which paths do we see leading beyond our current knowledge horizon? Do we need to create new paths and most of all, how do we do it together? 

-Human interaction in adaptive swarms are currently reforming society, body, strategy, technology and finance. What does the current idea of management mean in this situation, or courage? We will discuss the lowest common denominator for failures in both local issues like the Swedish school system and healthcare, and global issues within the financial crisis. We will present some emerging tools and concepts being used in innovative companies to make us better prepared in order to meet the grand challenges and needs of tomorrow’s society. Get involved and contribute to change!

Organized and led by: Karl McFaul and Jonas Birgersson

Journalist summary

Karl McFaul enlisted the assistance of his nine-year-old son, Vincent, to show the audience around a virtual city designed entirely by children in a collaborative online game, Minecraft. The impressive innovative potential expressed by the children served to illustrate how much more scope we have when we are not hampered by the limitations of friction between established systems and emerging systems. Karl argued that a management-centric model is no longer suitable for research and development in an information economy, which needs to become user-centric. Organisations need agile development methods that are need-driven, and can benefit from a “sharing society”.  

Jonas Birgersson illustrated the difference between natural and designed friction using examples from education and telecommunications. He proposed ways to combat designed friction by building values into the structure of organisations. Innovative start-ups bypass designed friction by using crowd-funding – as in the case of the Minecraft game, for example. 

Nicole Tyszkiewicz

Track: Society

Session: Session 3 ()

Location: Ideon ▸ Backstage

A4: The path of trials/ Returning with the elixir

The final of the three interventions (keynote + 2 breakout sessions) with Roy Leighton will explore what/who block our heroism and humanity and what we can do to begin our own hero’s journey of the next 101 Days. (Also see breakout session A:2)

Organized and led by Roy Leighton

Journalist summary

In this very lively session, Roy explored what happens in our minds when we learn. We all share a “PET” brain, which works on three levels – Primitive, Emotional, Thinking. Learning takes place when our brain remembers something relevant, interesting, naughty or fun – if we get all four at once the experience is unforgettable. (Certainly no audience member will forget Roy’s daughter’s pet guinea pig and his tragic – yet comical – death).

Sharing plenty of sources, Roy went on to sort people into types, according to the spiral dynamics model. Audience members recognised themselves in the types presented. Roy went on to show the parallels between individual psychological development and organisational development, both of which progress through 6 stages: Tribal, Self, Order, Enterprise, Community, Complexity. One of the keys to innovation and development is to be open to how others see the world and how they communicate. 

Nicole Tyszkiewicz

Track: Society

Session: Session 4 ()

Location: Ideon ▸ Backstage

A5: The Material Point/ Material science meets design and architecture and vice versa

The City of Lund will become a world-class environment for material research with the new facilities European Spallation Source and MAX IV.

New Users
Architects and designers are very interested in new material systems and also need them in order to address our challenges to design our future built environment. But how shall we stage this knowledge sharing and are there any natural creative “connection points” where the disciplines can meet? The first challenge we meet is how we formulate the right questions.

Another underlying question or opportunity is how the creative industry/aesthetics can “make sense” by presenting material know-how in new ways and thus make it accessible for other professionals and the public.

Participants:

- Alisa Andrasek: Designer at Biothing and Bloom Games. Director at GAD UCL Bartlett London

- Lars Montelius: Professor in Nanotechnology at the University of Lund

- Colin Carlile, Special Advisor at Science Village Scandinavia AB, Professor of Neutron and former Director of ESS Scandinavia. 

- Axel Steuwer, EForskningsstrateg/Science Officer/Industrial Liaison at MAX IV

- Jonas Runberger, M.Arch. PhD. Architect, Researcher and EducatorWhite Arkitekter and KTH School of Architecture

- Karl McFaul, Communications Strategist at European Spallation Source

Also present:

Invest in Skåne
Science Link

Organized by Mats Brodén Bioinspired Forum in collaboration with Jonas Runberger and Karl McFaul who will also lead the session.

The Material Point has initial support from Invest in Skåne and Swedish Agency for Economic and Regional Growth – Tillväxtverket.

Journalist summary

Almost a conference in itself, this session was rich in ideas and different perspectives as materials scientists, architects, designers and strategic thinkers exchanged their experiences and found new ways to connect. The new facilities in Lund – MAX IV and ESS – provide an opportunity to bridge the gap between research and industrial applications of materials science. Colin Carlile pointed out that although material science may not be sexy, it is important – for construction, pharmaceuticals, telecommunications, electrical conductors and much more. Lars Montelius presented the example of nanotechnology in LEDs and all the opportunities they offer to business and industry. Alisa Andrasek agreed, expanding on the potential applications of materials research in architecture with spectacular examples from her research. The session ended with a commitment to follow up on the new connections that were made.

Nicole Tyszkiewicz  

Track: Society

Session: Session 5 ()

Location: Ideon ▸ Backstage

B1: Is innovation going to save the climate?

Is innovation going to save the climate? Transition pathways for sustainable energy and transport.

The Nordic countries, including Sweden, are aiming to go beyond European targets and to achieve fossil independence or carbon neutrality in the energy and transport sectors by 2050. This may well require fundamental social and technological changes – almost reminiscent of an industrial revolution. All this makes it unlikely that any piecemeal solution, policy intervention or incentive will work. Any truly sustainable energy and transport system will have to emerge through considerable system innovation and ‘creative destruction’ – precisely the sort of change that might intimidate policymakers and major industrial actors – perhaps leading to paralysis.

This workshop focuses on three technology platforms for the development of sustainable transport solutions:

  • Electric mobility
  • Hydrogen systems
  • Biofuels

It will explore the following questions in interaction with the participants:

  • What potential innovative opportunities arise from a transition to sustainable energy and transport systems?
  • How will these innovations change existing value chains and/or give rise to new value chains?
  • What changes in framework conditions are needed to facilitate a transition to sustainable energy and transport systems?

Organized and led by Lars Coenen (CIRCLE) and Lars J. Nilsson (IMES)

Lars Coenen is Associate Professor in Economic Geography at Centre for Innovation, Research and Competence in the Learning Economy (CIRCLE) with a particular interest in the geographies of innovation.

Lars J Nilsson is professor at the department of Environmental and Energy, System Studies (IMES) at Lund Institute of Technology.

Journalist Summary

Lars Coenen and Lars J. Nilsson engaged the audience in a discussion about what will hopefully be a revolutionary transition from fossil fuels to more sustainable energy and transport systems in the future.

Coenen and J. Nilsson presented four alternatives: biofuel, electricity, hydrogen and electro-fuel.

The majority of the audience felt that electricity seemed the best alternative and the most probable scenario for the future.

The following discussion listed the pros and cons of electric cars and what demands on the public sector that have to be met in order for a transition to be successful. For instance, infrastructure will have to facilitate the recharging of batteries, since “range anxiety” is an important issue when it comes to the willingness of people to purchase an electric car.   

 Coenen and J. Nilsson asked the audience if we are to narrow in our perception of a car? In the future, it has been predicted that a substantial percentage of the world´s population will be living in big cities thus rendering the car unnecessary. Already, we are starting to see a change of attitude. Whereas before it was a status symbol to own your own car, today it is “cool to be green”.

Catrin Jakobsson

 

Track: Society 2

Session: Session 1 ()

Location: Palaestra ▸ Lower

B2: Public innovation funding instruments

Here we will present a number of successful funding instruments from a public policy perspective. We will also give examples on policy learning between countries and open up for discussions.

Led by Per Eriksson, Vice-Chancellor Lund University, and Kjell Håkan Närfelt, Chief Strategy Officer, VINNOVA

Track: Society 2

Session: Session 2 ()

Location: Ideon ▸ Square

B3: Experience of public innovation instruments

Here we will give some good examples of experience from different instrument users  and open up for the audience to participate with their own experience.

Led by Per Eriksson, Vice-Chancellor Lund University, and Kjell Håkan Närfelt, Chief Strategy Officer, VINNOVA

Track: Society 2

Session: Session 3 ()

Location: Ideon ▸ Square

B4: Heatherwick Studio – Designing the extraordinary

Stuart Wood is the Head of Innovation and a Project Designer at Heatherwick Studio in London, recognized for its widely-awarded work in furniture design, sculpture, architecture, urban infrastructure and strategic thinking.  At the heart of the studio˙s work is a profound commitment, at every scale, to finding innovative design solutions with an absolute dedication to artistic thinking and the latent potential of materials and craftsmanship.
 
In this session Stuart will be speaking about some of the studio˙s notable projects, which include the Olympic Cauldron for the 2012 Olympic Games, the New Bus for London, and the award winning UK Pavilion for the Shanghai World Expo 2010.
 
Journalist Summary
 
In this session Stuart Wood captivated the audience with footage from the opening of the 2012 Olympic games in London, showing the fantastic assembly of the Olympic cauldron.  The cauldron was an excellent example of the artistic dedication and commitment of Heatherwick Studio. Another astonishing example was the United Kingdom´s Pavilion at the 2010 World Expo in Shanghai.Wood opened with the question “Where do we expect Special?” When we go to an art gallery or a designer shop, we expect nice things. But we often have quite low expectations on everyday objects. But why be boring, when you can be creative? The aim of Heatherwick Studio is to bring surprise and joy to people in their everyday life. When taking on a project, they try to turn limitations on their head and be as creative as possible.

Catrin Jakobsson

 

Track: Society 2

Session: Session 4 ()

Location: Ideon ▸ Square

B5: Turning Knowledge into Value (for more people), new research and opportunities

Lund University is characterized as a comprehensive university with a great diversity of cutting edge knowledge. In this session we aspire to inspire – we enlighten you on what is going on in research today, thus enable you to find or create even better opportunities. We highlight some of the most excellent researchers and their work at Lund University, and discuss what kind of opportunities that could arise from these findings. 

Organized by: Lottie Olsson Norrsén (Sten K. Johnson Centre for Entrepreneurship, Lund University School of Economics and Management). Led by Marie Löwegren, Director, Sten K. Johnson Centre for Entrepreneurship. 

Journalist Summary

A lot of good science is never used until it is combined with other research and the knowledge of many different people. In this session different fields of research was presented by an inspiring group of people.

Ann Åkerman talked about the importance of spreading knowledge and encouraging entrepreneurship in the developing countries.

Lars Samuelsson presented Lund Nano Lab and talked about the use of nano wires in medical treatments and how we can use nano science to design structures with functionality.

Tommy Andersson described how a mathematical algorithm could be used in solving matching problems in society. By applying the algorithm you could match children to schools, improve organ donation logistics and solve the problem of student housing.

Klas Sjöberg presented his research on the use of different wavelengths (colors) of light for medical purposes. Red light can be used to treat depression, yellow light to help people with Alzheimer, green light to help Parkinson patients and Blue light to decrease the growth of bacteria.

Catrin Jakobsson

Track: Society 2

Session: Session 5 ()

Location: Ideon ▸ Square

C1: Long Term Survival Strategies

This breakout session will be a discussion about how to participate in projects that could take centuries or even millennia to come to fruition.

Organized and led by Annalee Newitz

Journalist summary:

This breakout session was a workshop on how to participate in projects that could take centuries or even millennia to come to fruition. It was organized and led by Annalee Newitz

Organizer Annalee Newitz divided us into smaller groups who were given a long term goal which would take more than a life time to reach, i.e. colonisation of space, population longevity, geo-engineering of the planet or a planet free from fossil fuels.

Groups were given a specific goal and asked to discuss, develop and present a strategy to reach those goals. Two central issues were supposed to be addressed in the strategy:

  • The need to implant short-term payoffs, technologies etc, to give incentives to lead us closer to our goal.
  • Identify unintended consequences of technological innovations that would be required to reach that goal (social, economic and political etc.).

In the case of space colonisation: Innovations in energy, transport, greenhouses for living  and collaborations between institutions could provide short term payoff technologies on the way towards colonies in space. Side effects could be weapons, environmental exploitation, political conflicts on property rights.

Track: Technology

Session: Session 1 ()

Location: Academic Society ▸ Plenary

C2: The Innovation is in the Mind: neuroscience, nanotechnology and information technology on a convergence path

In this session we will look deeper into the research that is usually referred to by the term Brain Machine Interface. Today we have Deep Brain Stimulation but what are the opportunities and obstacles within this exciting area. What signals can we monitor within the brain and what can we control? What can the combination of neuroscience, nanotechnology and information technology bring us?

Organized and led by Jan Rabaey and Viktor Öwall, Professor in Circuit Design, Head of the Department of Electrical and Information Technology and the Director of VINNOVA Industrial Excellence Center in System Design on Silicon.

Journalist summary:

Jan Rabaey initiated an open discussion with questions from the audience on his presentation “The innovation is in our mind”. Two main directions or areas of application were identified for the research in Brain Machine Interface: 

  1. Rehabilitation of functions of the human body and mind
  2. Augmentation of the functions of the human body and mind

The driver of innovation

The latter of these two was discussed as an issue of moral and ethical concern. Military interest and applications are close at hand. At this point innovation is driven mainly towards rehabilitating, i.e. helping people who are disabled or struggle with neurological disorders to regain movement through brain-controlled prosthesis and smart implants.

Hurdles and billion dollar programs

Two billion dollar projects have been launched separately in the US and European Union aimed at mapping, understanding and building models of how brain works. The field is still in its infancy and many hurdles have to be overcome. An example is how to read signals from our brains. “If we would want to monitor every single one of the 100 billion neurons in our brains the amount of data produced would be 100 gigabits/second”, at the moment scientists are working with wireless implants that can transfer by “kilobytes/second”.

Jan Rabaey pointed out that many scientists have invented first and discover social and philosophical issues later. Jan Rabaey thinks that this time it’s important to communicate and discuss implications across academic disciplines, such as sociologists and psychologists, and to wider society.

Track: Technology

Session: Session 2 ()

Location: Ideon ▸ Forum

C3: Innovation and its challenges

In this session we will discuss how innovation occurs, what methods to follow, what are the challenges with innovation, and how innovations get adopted by the masses. It will be a very interactive session. We will also review current innovations in development and their chances of being widely adopted. 

Organized and led by Chander Chawla, who has lived in six countries, worked in every area of the mobile ecosystem and is a renowned multi-disciplinary, cross-functional, predictive thinker He frequently writes about mobile (as well as philosophy, the arts and human behavior) on his blog at cdoq.blogspot.com 

Journalist summary:

Chander Chawla invited the audience behind the scenes in the making and marketing of the SmartSense braclet, an wearable device that addressed health issues with mobile technology. What were the methods for creating innovation? How can you increase the diffusion of new innovations?

Innovations solve problems

The team began with asking questions. What are some of the problems we could solve with mobile technology? Rising health care costs all over the world with a health system mainly focused on cure not prevention. To make people more aware about fitness and thereby preventing health issues seemed to be a path to innovation.

It was also an issues that could be solved with wearable technology, a mobile technology that can both read data from and inform the person carrying the device of the progress of their training. A diverse set of technologies was enlisted to meet the challenge: Cloud computing, sensors, social networking, gaming, bluetooth, electronic packaging.

Innovation is about choosing

A number of choices were necessary to meet their goal. Functional choices like: should the device be worn on the wrist, foot or close to the heart? Category choices that would affect target group, market size and distribution channels: Should the device be categorized as a wellness or a medical device in the US? Design choices which affect target group, function and technology: Sport or fashion? Technology choices: How many features?

Here is an example of answers to what the SmartSense bracelet would measure: 

  1. Physical activity (steps, intensity, miles walked, calories burned) 
  2. Stress 
  3. Skin temperature and ambient temperature 
  4. Heart-rate
  5. Sleep pattern

The team of SmartSense had a couple of important criteria that were to be met before continuing the process:

  • Technical feasibility
  • Market validity
  • Customer validation
  • Prototyping

Finally Chander Chawla stressed the importance of social, incentives to use the product as well as testing, prototyping and validating the product on the market.

Track: Technology

Session: Session 3 ()

Location: Ideon ▸ Forum

C4: Extreme open innovation approaches for technology breakthroughs that protect the planet. Part 1

In this double-session (part I and II), we will meet leaders from the industries of automotive, urban mobility, cleantech, medical instruments and chemicals. They all have one mission in common – making breakthroughs that protect the planet. This session will reveal inspirational examples straight from the breakthrough innovation pipeline of the companies that dare to be pioneers.

  • Open Innovation Going Extreme – Update on Recent Trends by Axel Rosenø, CEO of Innovation Roundtable.
  • The Alfa Laval Radical Innovation Venture process:  How to get highly unsecured concepts proven and how to use networking between companies as starting point for new business creation
  • Snapshots on Breakthroughs that Revolutionize Material Performance and Emission Reduction – Axel Rosenø and Sigvald Harryson introducing Executives and Scientists related to innovation leaders like LEGO, Philips and AkzoNobel.
  • What´s Next? Exploring the Spin-Off Collaboration Dimension of Open Innovation.

Organized and led by Axel Rosenø and Sigvald Harryson on behalf of Innovation Roundtable ApS and Ideon Innovation – sponsored by Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Southern Sweden.

Journalist summary:

Sigvald Harryson presented the idea behind Collaborative University Competitions. Universities from Sweden, Poland and China among others participate in these competitions where real world problems are taken in from companies. The aim is to create solutions to companies’ problems through so called Co-creation and open innovation. The teams consist of senior academics, such as professors, and master students.

The concept builds on knowledge sharing. Philips is one of the many international companies who have contributed with cases to the competition. Quantity of ideas is an important aspect of innovation. So teams go from hundreds of ideas, boiling down to 5-15 initial concepts and finally narrowing down to 1-3 solutions selected as innovation projects. In the case of Philips a shortage of raw material for a product resulted in new inventions that are now undergoing patent applications and commercial application.

Innovation, the case of Alpha Laval

Alpha Laval is a business to business company that heat, cool, separate and transport liquids. Their product development is stimulated more or less by a open innovation model they call “The Alfa Laval Radical Innovation Venture process”.

They guide new concepts from approaching startups, partners and inhouse RnD through an innovation process that is meant to make unsecure concepts into commercially validated products. They prefer that startups come with a patent so IP questions, like who owns what, are more easily solved. In all cases the business model has to be validated with a customer focused check list:

  1. Customer discovery
  2. Customer validation
  3. Customer creation
  4. Company building

Alfa Laval works with organisations that house startups for new impulses and suppliers to teach them what problems Alfa Laval would like to solve. Not forgetting the internal processes: Are our 9 product centers talking to each other on what progress we’re making in different areas?

Varies types of innovation are coming through the system: cost saves, upgrades, new generation products and breakthroughs.

Track: Technology

Session: Session 4 ()

Location: Ideon ▸ Forum

C5: Extreme open innovation approaches for technology breakthroughs that protect the planet. Part 2

  • What´s Next? University Collaboration Going Extreme – The Collaborative Competition Approach by Sigvald Harryson, CEO of iKnow-Who.com
  • Snapshots on Breakthroughs that Support Clean Urban Mobility – Sigvald Harryson with executives and researchers from companies like Bombardier, Tesla Motors, Nissan, Volvo and a company providing the first charging carport based on renewable energies and renewable material (InnoVentum).
  • Next Stop – Highlights from an open innovation approach by Chicago Municipality to design new Bus Stop solutions supporting clean urban mobility.

Organized and led by Sigvald Harryson and Axel Rosenø on behalf of Innovation Roundtabl and Ideon Innovation – sponsored by Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Southern Sweden.

Journalist summary:

What can we learn from dogs? In this session Sigvald Harryson presented one of the non-profit cases in one of the Collaborative University Competitions. He started out by bringing a dog into room. But not just any dog. One that can revolutionise the treatment of epilepsy.

Seizure alert dogs are, as implied by their name, dogs that can sense and notify their human companions of an oncoming seizure. Determining how dogs are able to detect seizures in advance might hold the key for a breakthrough.

The field is developing and implant technology for seizure prediction, such as NeuroVista and NeuroPace, are other technological prospects that may contribute to a better life for patients. All these options look promising since it matches market criterias:

  • Attractiveness to Patients
  • Business Potential
  • Screening Criteria

Contactless power transmission by Bombardier transportation

The number of electric buses is expected to explode in the coming 10 years due to demographic and technological changes. Bombardier is tapping into to this growing market by technological innovations that allow contactless power transmission, dropping heavy batteries and allowing charging process to be integrated into the normal bus operations.

This technology can be widely applied and could be an enormous leap forward into developing more sustainable transportation by car, bus or train worldwide. 

Track: Technology

Session: Session 5 ()

Location: Ideon ▸ Forum

D1: MindLab – rethinking the public sector

This session is led by Runa Sabroe, a project manager and an expert in involving users in development at MindLab – a Danish cross- ministerial innovation unit which involves citizens and businesses in developing new solutions for the public sector.  

MindLab is instrumental in helping the ministry’s key decision-makers and employees view their efforts from the outside-in, to see them from a citizen’s perspective. MindLab use this approach as a platform for co-creating better ideas. Runa Sabroe will share how MindLab has applied design-led methods for more than a decade to help public servants across three ministries re-think their policies and services

What works and what are the key challenges? What does it take from organisations to succed with this approach?

Organized and led by Runa Sabroe, MindLab.

Journalist summary
Faced with an eager audience, Runa Sabroe began to tell how Mindlab is working with innovation. Mindlab is a development organisation that involves citizens and businesses to create new solutions that provide value to the community. The three key areas are creativity, innovation and partnership through design, social research and public administration.
What makes Mindlab innovative is that they always assume the perspective of the end user as they work with different problems in different government organisations. The work is done in areas such as employment and digital self. By putting the citizens’ perspective in the centre, they have managed to combine and simplify the various agencies’ work. They use a holistic approach.

Questions raised in their work:
What is going on out there?
Do we understand the situation of people who will be affected by the policy?
And what does it imply?
How will the end user respond to this initiative?

Tobias Åkerman

Track: Strategy

Session: Session 1 ()

Location: Academic Society ▸ Lilla salen

D2: Entrepreneurial leadership in a sustainable community

On May 13th 2013 the Swedish minister of environment, Lena Ek, welcomed 33 young entrepreneurs from Skåne to an exclusive seminar on sustainability. The trip was originally an initiative from the ministry, but has extended into an annual program that will gather entrepreneurs from all municipalities of Skåne to form a network of small businesses for great challenges. This session will demonstrate the importance of entrepreneurial leadership when building a sustainable community.

Organized and led by Region Skåne

Journalist summary
The session began with an introductory view of the need for large and small companies. This need has grown even stronger in the fourth wave of industrialisation. The moderator stated that community leaders need to have social relationships in the community as this is the driving force for entrepreneurship.

Three young entrepreneurs entered the stage, each one working in an innovative way in their community. A young man successfully cultivated mushrooms in coffee grounds and had developed a tool kit with the possibility of national scalability. “I didn’t go out to be a leader, but I became one”, he stated.
A woman talked about how she worked in a company which acted as a catalyst and incubator for local social innovation and entrepreneurs.

Key idea to take away:
Get to know your community and you will find both the need and the resources.

Tobias Åkerman

Track: Strategy

Session: Session 2 ()

Location: Medicon Village ▸ Guest Restaurant

D3: Lean + Agile = Innovation?

“Faster, better, cheaper.” We have heard this well-known mantra from the proponents of lean manufacturing, and we also recognize it from the agile development philosophy that have gained traction in the field of software development. However, making a product “better” by gradually improving the technical performance of individual pieces of hardware or software is no longer sufficient to stay ahead of the competition. 

Today, innovation is more about great user experiences than the latest technological advances, and if we aim to deliver such experiences, we must understand how to more effectively work in cross-functional teams that transcend the traditional boundaries between hardware, software and service design. 

This workshop will give participants a deeper understanding of how lean and agile approaches can be combined and adapted to more effectively support cross-functional development teams working with product-service system innovations.

Organized and led by

Rune Hvalsøe, Section Manager, SW Android – Social Experience, Sony Mobile Communications.

Andreas Larsson, Associate Professor in Innovation Engineering at the Department of Design Sciences, Lund University’s Faculty of Engineering (LTH).

Journalist summary

  • Competition is necessary for innovation.
  • Companies fall apart when their model is so successful that it stifles thinking that challenges it.
  • What prevents innovation? Organisations with a blame culture. A culture that doesn’t listen to new ideas or take notice.
  • People want to be crazy and innovative, but not all companies understand that.
  • Faster – better – less waste – higher quality. Identify if it works or not.
  • Playfulness is a key component in the development of innovative things.
  • Teams, not individuals, always come up with the best ideas.
  • Planning 8 weeks ahead helps the team to stay on track, meet all deadlines, deliver on time and provides time for creative innovative processes.
  • Challenge people to solve problems outside their comfort zone.
  • Bring people from a different environment into your team. Get them to challenge your team mindset and give them inspiration on different subjects.
  • The presentation can be found at: agileblog.danskerne.se

Tobias Åkerman

Track: Strategy

Session: Session 3 ()

Location: Medicon Village ▸ Guest Restaurant

D4: Innovation Psychology: how to attain behaviors of innovation

Despite increasing knowledge and insights about how to manage innovation, organizations still testify disappointment in the outcome: too little, too incremental, too plain. What is missing? In this break out session you will get a taste of the psychology of innovation: what makes us as individuals and groups innovative, how can innovative behaviors like risk taking and questioning common truths happen? And what is holding us back? With a blend of industry experience and research you will gain insights and be provided with concrete tools for how to bring innovation out of management and into the daily life of the organization. 

Organized and led by Susanna Bill

Journalist summary
Everyone gets to do an exercise which includes interacting with one another and creating change.

  • “Innovation is creative destruction” – Ron Boschma
  • Organisations need to understand that change also is a loss.
  • We need to build in trust in the organisation.
  • Key challenges: Establish trust, predictability, vulnerability
  • Risk + failure = shame. The feeling of shame makes people not to take any risks.
  • Failure is learning in an uncomfortable way.
  • Ambiguity
  • People lose their ability to innovate. We need to open up our planning for a space to think.
  • Innovation needs space.
  • It won’t happen if you don’t do it.
  • Everyone needs to take risks and experiment.
  • Make a mental contract with yourself. Answer these two questions “My key idea to take away is:” and “Friday morning I will:”

Tobias Åkerman

Track: Strategy

Session: Session 4 ()

Location: Medicon Village ▸ Guest Restaurant

D5: What is Innovation – really (or possibly)?

A technical solution? A new product? An app? Something you can patent and sell? Or could it just as well be new ways of organizing, spreading information or making decisions?

We asked a number of groups of university students from different fields of education to make their own definitions and explanations of the concept of innovation. In this workshop, these will be presented, compared, questioned and discussed. Join in for new perspectives. 

Organized and led by Jan Rollof, a former physician, who among many other things has written several books on innovation and creativity, and also conducts research within these fields. 

Journalist summary
“If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail” – Abraham Maslow

  • Everyone looks at the world differently. Broaden your view.
  • Your challenge is to see the bigger picture. Broaden your understanding of what innovation is.
  • It’s all in the eye of the beholder.
  • Innovation is movement and direction. Innovation is moving you forward. Direction is all about going from current operations into the lane of innovation.
  • It’s also about the ability to understand the potential value.
  • Selection and recognition.
  • Interpretations of innovation from students representing six different scientific disciplines: “why hasn’t anyone thought of this before?”, “it’s an improvement”, “solution that haven’t been conceptualised before”, “new solution through a process”, “collaboration”, “renewal”.
  • You must have the ability to communicate an idea.
  • Show open-mindedness around innovation and move towards a new way of thinking.

Tobias Åkerman

Background, summary and conclusions by workshop leader Jan Rollof

Why is it important to discuss what innovation is and can be? Because it determines the ability to spot new opportunities and ideas, as well as the value we attribute to them. Expectations, assumptions, and beliefs govern perception. A broad view makes it possible to appreciate novel phenomena of different types and shapes, originating in different contexts. A narrow view excludes ideas that could have great potential value and usefulness.

The view on what innovation is, and can be, is highly relevant for open innovation. Today it is increasingly accepted that no single organization can have all the best ideas internally, however good it is. Openness to new phenomena in the external environment is crucial Understanding the full breadth of innovation is also crucial for generation and elaboration of one´s own ideas – the strengths of a wide range of options to draw from.

There are many definitions of innovation, used in different contexts and for different purposes. There is no single “correct” definition; the realm of innovation comprises a wide range of novel endeavors, from art to business, from independent entrepreneurs to big corporations, and from social innovations to for-profit enterprises. However, the most typical view on innovation still reflects a producentric perspective – a legacy from the industrial era. Now an inclusive view is needed, that also includes decentralized innovation. Conventional and narrow definitions are not relevant for increasing portion of innovations. The innovation landscape is wider and flatter than ever before. It is also dynamic; the pace of change is rapid. 

The objective with this workshop project was to broaden the view on innovation and bring different interpretations into a common framework that allows discussions on innovation in one and the same space.

Process

In preparation for this workshop, six young people active in different fields of education and business were asked to prepare their personal definition of innovation, relevant to their respective field. At the workshop, they presented their definitions, with comments and clarifications. The definitions were placed in a number of charts (see below).

 The completed charts (below) show that the importance attributed to different aspects of innovation varies considerably. Context, specific interests, and many other factors may contribute to this diversity of views.

It should be emphasized that this project was not a scientific study, and the results can not be generalized. That said, the results of the workshop indicate that the view on what innovation is differs across different fields of knowledge. Appreciating and accepting this diversity of views is important because it allows recognition of the broad opportunities for innovation; in contrast, a narrow view, and single definitions, will limit the field of vision.

The methodology used for this workshop could be used as a guide for proper research. The charts could be used in such studies but also for exploring different aspects of ongoing and planned innovation projects.

I thank the participants for their excellent work, and for making the workshop successful and fun to work with.

Jan Rollof

Definitions 

Gabriella Rubin: Design (DE) “Innovation is about delivering solutions, products, services etc. that contributes to and enables (positive) change on a more systemic level. Innovation is about redefining our behaviour and needs, to build on what exists today and bring it into a new context to create something for tomorrow.” 

Carlos Urey: Medical research  (MR) “The application of a novel idea or invention leading to benefit of patients through improved prevention, treatment, diagnosis, prediction, prognostication and/or monitoring of disease with the overall goal of increasing quality of life, life expectancy and/or cost-effectiveness of care.” 

Joakim Sten: Cultural Analysis (CA) “A solution or action not previously acknowledged or conceptualized, which comes into being to meet specific matters of affairs. It is a shared process, involving active innovators, resource network and users alike. As such, innovation is based in the realities of people (their ideas, tendencies, needs, wants, services or products, etc.) and in turn affects these realities to inform or inspire further innovation.” 

Erik Schultz: Business and Economics (BE) “Innovation should be seen as a new product or processual solution that leads to increased aggregated benefit in relation to the resources it consumes. Innovation as a process is the series of activities that leads to this product or solution. A new product or solution that does not increase aggregated benefit in relation to the resources it consumes could be seen as a part of the innovation process but should not be seen as an innovation.” 

Philip Werner: Technology and Entrepreneurs (TE) Innovation could be for example: the process of taking an idea to a product and then bring it all the way to the market, the innovation of an invention, the use of a new solution to fill a need in the market, to continuously develop and improve your products or to do something you usually do in a totally new way.” 

Mikael Johansson: Small companies and Entrepreneurs (SC) “Why hasn´t anyone thought of this before?” – Something new and useful that solves a problem and makes life easier, or something you did not know you needed.”

 

Charts 0005mH 0006wA 0007D8 0008Z3 0009Vm

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Track: Strategy

Session: Session 5 ()

Location: Medicon Village ▸ Guest Restaurant

E1: Thinking in time: Cognition, Communication and Learning (CCL)

Learn more about how the brain interacts with technology and the world. Get insights about innovative techniques for communication and learning.

Organized by Cognition, Communication and Learning (CCL). A multidisciplinary research environment at Lund University.

Panel: Germund Hesslow, Jana Holsanova, Peter Gärdenfors and Birgitta Sahlén.

Presentation of panel:

Germund Hesslow is Professor of Neuroscience and Associate Professor Philosophy at Lund University. He has worked as a teacher and researcher in philosophy, mainly philosophy of science and philosophy of mind. His major area of interest has been the concept of causality in science.

His main research area, however, has been neurophysiology, in particular associative learning in the cerebellum. He studies the mechanisms in nerve cells underlying how animals and humans learn conditioned reflexes and how these responses are timed.

He has developed a theory of cognitive function, the “simulation hypothesis”, which has been implemented in robotics by several research groups. In neuroscience, his most important contributions have been the discovery of a cellular counterpart of the conditioned reflex, the demonstration of a cellular mechanism of timing the and the discovery of a cellular mechanism for negative feedback control of learning.

Germund Hesslow is coordinator of the Linnaeus research environment Thinking in Time: Cognition, Communication and Learning.

Jana Holsanova is Associate Professor in Cognitive Science at Lund university. She works as research leader for a project linked to the Humanities Laboratory, and as a senior researcher in Linnaeus environment Cognition, Communication, and Learning. She is interested in how users attend to, perceive, understand and remember information that others want to mediate. In particular, her research concerns the interplay of language and images and its role for learning, visual thinking, and interaction with various media.

Her books include “Discourse, vision and cognition” (Benjamins 2008), “Myths and facts about reading” (Norstedts 2010) and “Methodologies for multimodal research” (Sage 2012), focusing on novel methods and tools for the analysis of visual communication.

Jana Holsanova is Vice-chair/ Chair-elect of the Visual Communication Division, International Communication Association (2011-2015) and Chairman of the Swedish Braille Authority at the Swedish Agency for Accessible Media.

Peter Gärdenfors is professor of Cognitive Science at Lund University. He is one of the initiators of the Linneaus environment Cognition Communication and Learning. His main research concerns concept learning, semantics and the evolution of thinking. He also tries to implement the theoretical models from these areas to help constructing robots that can interact with humans in a natural way.

Among his several books, one can mention Conceptual Spaces (MIT Press 2000), How Homo Became Sapiens (Oxford UP 2003, translated into six languages) and The Geometry of Meaning (MIT Press, to appear).

Peter Gärdenfors is member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Letters, History and Antiquities, member of Academia Europaea, member of Leopoldina Deutsche Akademie für Naturforscher and member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Science. He is also member of the Prize Committee for the Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel since 2011.

Birgitta Sahlén is Professor in Speech Pathology, Lund university. Her main research interest is in cognition and communication of children with language impairment and hearing impairment. She has, during the last ten years,  studied the role of working memory capacity in literacy development and in peer interaction. Currently she studies contextual influences (the sound environment and dynamic aspects of teachers’ speech) on comprehension and learning in the class-room in children with typical and atypical language development.  

Journalist Summary

How to socialize with robots? Peter Gärdenfors lines up the challenges beyond developing human-robot joint attention techniques. How do we read others, how do we model joint intentions, joint beliefs or morality?

Does the voice of the teacher matter for the learning of children? Birgitta Sahlén emphasize that we also need to focus on the teacher, not only on new techniques. A teacher with a clear (not hoarse) voice and with a good body language makes a better job in the noisy classrooms of today.

Is it true that a picture is worth more than 1000 words? With the help of tracking eye movements Jana Holsanova has shown that this is not always true. Illustrations need to be integrated in the text – graphical markers, color-coding and composition helps the reader to learn from both illustrations and text.

Pia Romare

Track: Body

Session: Session 1 ()

Location: Academic Society ▸ Concert Hall

E2: Move your ideas forward

- innovation workshop where we will move participant’s current ideas and projects forward by sharing ideas and resources, co-creating and evolving together.

Today it seems like everybody is talking about how to improve employee engagement or participant interaction and the interest in open innovation, resource sharing and social collaboration is growing for every passing day. In today’s connected world we are constantly reminded that we are all in it together and that we need to combine our different ideas and resources in a totally new way to create the world we want. 

With more than 7 billion people on the planet, we all have dreams and ideas we would love to see realized. The fact is that most of these things could absolutely come true, if only we had the time, resources and support needed to make them happen. In this workshop we will explore how we can move things forward for ourselves and for our organisation, community or the world through an interactive process of open innovation and resource based networking.

Organised by Gadogi and led by Torkel Stålhand

Journalist Summary

Yes, people do like to share their dreams. In the room the voices of about forty people are buzzing as we sit in groups and discuss ideas that may help to move our dreams forward. How can I get more attention to my new company, one woman in my group asks. During the session we collect a whole set of questions about networking, how to speed up the innovation process etc. Questions that are turned into new projects on the Gadogi website. The message is, that by inviting others to share and comment on your ideas on this website you may start the process that may help you get answers and ask new ones.

As I leave the room I notice that the woman from my group still is involved in discussions. Yes, people do like to help!

The website can be found at www.Gadogi.com .

Pia Romare

 

Track: Body

Session: Session 2 ()

Location: Medicon Village ▸ Auditorium

E3: How online medicine and m-health will change global healthcare

On-line medicine and m-health has an enormous potential to change global healthcare.

The technical development will go hand in hand with distributed knowledge management and offer access to basic healthcare services for almost everybody at low prices.This workshop will present interesting examples of distributed knowledge management and discuss new ways to facilitate collaboration between healthcare providers, institutions and organisations.

Organized and presented by Olof Jarlman – a doctor and scientist within radiology, whose current work focuses in online medicine and the opportunities that come with it – and Artur Zang. 

Journalist Summary

Maybe the new health care systems will come from Africa! While organizing basic health care for millions of people in remote villages we have to come up with new solutions – some of them may also benefit our “old” systems, according to Olof Jarlman. The basis for the health care within the Glocal Green Village project is to set up local health care centers. This requires sustainable electricity sources that will help provide clean water and computer services. A global connection provides the possibility for e-learning to educate local workers and the use of telemedicine devises and consultation. New technology will also give us “robot docs” for decisions support. With future technology to help with examinations and decision making, our medical students in Sweden may also focus more on their social skills – on communicating with the patient, says Olof Jarlman.

Pia Romare

Track: Body

Session: Session 3 ()

Location: Medicon Village ▸ Auditorium

E4: Playing at work – the shortcut to enhancing organizational creativity

“If people never did silly things, nothing intelligent would ever get done.”

- Ludwig Wittgenstein (an über serious philosopher). 

Playing in the workplace may be one of the most exciting new development in  creativity research. In this breakout session/workshop you will experientially learn how play enhances creativity and how to enrich your work environment with the engaging power of play.

Organized and led by Samuel West – a psychologist and creativity researcher at Lund University.

 

Journalist Summary

A large group of people had gathered at this session – all eager to play. And play we did! I managed to throw two pieces of candy into the mouth of my playmate. Everyone was trying hard to catch the flying pink candy, feeling a little bit silly, but laughing together. This, Samuel West explains, is a good energizer at a conference.

To play can be defined as “to do something for fun without expecting any outcome”. Thus, play at work should be voluntary and not organized. In his research Samuel West is trying to find a way to introduce play as a behavioral approach at work. If you can do your work task in a playful way this opens up for more creativity and better work relations.

Pia Romare

 

Track: Body

Session: Session 4 ()

Location: Medicon Village ▸ Auditorium

E5: Sharing learning from dental care to reinforce health promotion

Why do we visit our dentist once a year, but not our house doctor?

Public dental care has been successful. Can health care organizations use a similar approach for e g diabetes prevention, and how can politicians and the Academia support this development?

In the panel:
 Dan Ericson, Professor at the Faculty of Odontology at Malmö University – About toothpaste, a cosmetic  turned into a preventive product when fluoride was added.

Gunilla Klingberg, Professor at the Faculty of Odontology at Malmö University – Improvements in dental health – what is behind the success story?

Introduced by Charlotte Åkerman, Head of Collections, Kulturen Museum, Lund

Initiated, organized and lead by Medicon Village, Lund, in cooperation with Kulturen Museum in Lund and the Medical history collections of Region Skåne.

Journalist Summary

The craving for sugar is strong in humans, sugar makes you happy in the short run, although it makes you fat and gives you caries in the long run. Professor Dan Ericson tells us about the success story of toothpaste. Adding fluoride to this cosmetic product has dramatically decreased the occurrence of cavities in the teeth of younger people – although they eat more sugar today than 30 – 40 years ago. And the good thing is that people like to use toothpaste because good, white, teeth makes us feel more attractive! Maybe there are other ways in which we may add drugs to cosmetics and thus combine the desire to be attractive with preventive health care?

The Swedish system with free dental care for children has decreased the likelihood for dental illness even more. Today the challenge is to maintain good dental status in those who are old and sick.

Pia Romare

 

Track: Body

Session: Session 5 ()

Location: Medicon Village ▸ Auditorium

OT1 + OT1a: Hands-On Creativity: Upcycling Waste + The Open Arena 5 experience

OT1 Hands-on creativity: Upcycling waste

Create sustainable business value, reduce waste and have fun! In a hands-on creativity workshop, the students of the Master programme in Entrepreneurship challenge you to just do it! With simple tools and creative thinking, you can solve significant environmental problems and create business value at the same time.

Organized by Lottie Olsson Norrsén (Sten K. Johnson Centre for Entrepreneurship, Lund University School of Economics and Management). Venue: LU Open

 

OT1a  A step towards Open Innovation Arenas: The Open Arena 5 experience

OpenArena5 is a project run by the 5 universities of southern Sweden within the Innovation Office South (IKS), with a financial support from the European Regional Development Fund and managed by LU Open  

Through user-driven, open and interdisciplinary cooperation, the project gives rise to new tools, methods and approaches in order to bridge the existing gap between research results, university competence and business and societal needs. Focusing in the development of new open innovation processes it aims to improve the conditions which will allow the increased utilisation of university knowledge in strengthening the Skåne and Blekinge region’s innovation capacity.

The project runs 5 Pilots in the areas of Food, Smart Cities, Personal Health, IT, and Life Science which test these new methods and tools and give valuable insight regarding their preconditions, challenges and success factors.

The workshop aims to share the experience and lessons learned until present, increase the dialog that it has already undertaken with regional innovation actors and discuss how open Innovation processes speed up impact and results in the regional innovation strategy.

Venue: LU Open

Track: Open Track

Session: Session 2 ()

Location: Ideon ▸ LU Open

OT2: Materials evolution

How do we accelerate discovery of new materials?

This initiative fuses open and closed innovation working in concerted six-month cycles with industry and academics to generate new IP for industry. While at the same time contributing to a public knowledge base of known and completely novel materials. The methodology – inspired by the US ”Materials Project” – crowd-sources contributions from the scientific theoretical modelling community to search for completely new materials for solving tomorrow’s challenges.

The major challenge is to successfully produce win-win outcomes for all actors: Academics working in an open innovation environment, Large industrial actors (who co-sponsor but are dedicated to closed innovation) and SMEs (who will benefit from the public resources generated in the project). We will show how we can align the interests of these sectors in a way which targets the wants and needs of each, and by doing so demonstrate Swedish excellence in Europe and the world.

Track: Open Track

Session: Session 3 ()

Location: Ideon ▸ LU Open

OT3 + OT4: Personalized health + Creating Competitive Jobs

Two simultaneous sessions at LU Open:

Personalized Health:

Data is defining your health, but who owns your data on the future? There are many question today in the fields of personalized health and your profile regarding health. As the health sector is challenged by cost efficiency measures and restructuring efforts your data profile is fragmented at best as it is today. Trends of the future are pointing towards the personalized health sector with the individuals are the carriers and owners of health profiles and data set? But how will this sector emerge and what innovations must happen to take us truly into the 21st century?

Creating Competitive Jobs:

CCJobs is an Interreg project between Swedish and Danish universities and business organizations who want to test a new method to utilize research and increase companies’ ability to absorb it. Participation in the project is completely free for all small and medium-sized businesses that have an idea but lack the time, expertise and capital to develop it. Companies are given support in the form of interdisciplinary expertise and salary for an employee that will work with the idea. Come to this information meeting to get some more information about the project and support with your application!

Track: Open Track

Session: Session 4 ()

Location: Ideon ▸ LU Open

OT5: Future cities

For the first time in human history the majority of the world’s population lives in urban areas. The world’s cities will continue to grow as people are moving from rural areas in search of better jobs and new opportunities to improve their day-to-day lives.

As cities grow, so do the opportunities and the challenges. The cities of tomorrow are a fundament for economic growth, science and technology, creativity, as well as places of tolerance and respect. At the same time the future cities will confront problems such as climate change, congestion, unemployment, integration etc. Looking ahead innovation will have to be fostered to support a transition towards future cities dealing with all the challenges.

The implementation of innovation strategies for future cities is becoming essential at all levels and new forms of innovation processes should be initiated to respond to these urban challenges.

Track: Open Track

Session: Session 5 ()

Location: Ideon ▸ LU Open